Natremed, Unit B9, Keepsafe Self Storage Ltd. Bailey Hall Road, Halifax,  HX3 9XJ



Ernie 0771 737 5815

emial physicoolbandage
CM-Store phone 07717375815

Leading Natural Health Product Supplier for Professional and Personal User

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Ernie 0771 737 5815

emial physicoolbandage
CM-Store phone 07717375815

Natremed,

Unit B9

Keepsafe Self Storage Ltd

Bailey Hall Road

Halifax,

HX3 9XJ

Contact Natremed

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Injury Treatment  Biofreeze

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Product Information
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Diabetic Infromaton Foot Care Biofreeze Spray Biofreeze Usage
Polar Frost Nuflex Nuflex Massage Oil Sore No More
TheraFlex GT-501 Mini Massager Pads & Wires Diabetic Products Foot care products Akileine Foot Care Akildia for Diabetics W-803 Wireless TENs W-803 Pads
Nemidon Gels
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iPhone-iPad TENs 24K Gold Beauty Bar Argan Hair Care Picksan Lice Stop Picksan No Lice Physicool Products
Cold Wraps & Sleeves Hair Care Products Nail Care Products Pain Relief products Picksan Lice Stop Picksan No Lice TENs
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Akildia Crème:
General Information for Diabetics

Wash your feet in warm water every day using Akildia Foot Bath Oil. Make sure the water is not too hot. By testing the temperature with your elbow. Do not soak your feet. Dry your feet well, especially between your toes.


Look at your feet every day to check for cuts, sores, blisters, redness, calluses, or other problems. Checking every day is even more important if you have nerve damage or poor blood flow. If you cannot bend over or pull your feet up to check them, use a mirror. If you cannot see well, ask someone else to check your feet.


If your skin is dry, Clean feet with Akildia Foot wash Lotion. Also after washing dry them well and Use Akildia protective Creme, this is specially  formulated for diabetics.


File corns and calluses gently with Akileine Foot file. Do this after your bath or shower.


Cut your toenails once a week or when needed. Cut toenails when they are soft from washing. Cut them to the shape of the toe and not too short. File the edges with an emery board.


Always wear slippers or shoes to protect your feet from injuries.


Always wear socks or stockings to avoid blisters. Do not wear socks or knee-high stockings that are too tight below your knee.


Wear shoes that fit well. Shop for shoes at the end of the day when your feet are bigger. You can use Insolia shoe inserts, these are designed to move your weight back onto the heel, taking pressure off the forefoot. Break in shoes slowly. Wear them 1 to 2 hours each day for the first few weeks.

Before putting your shoes on, feel the insides to make sure they have no sharp edges or objects that might injure your feet

High blood glucose from diabetes causes two problems that can hurt your feet:

Nerve damage. One problem is damage to nerves in your legs and feet. With damaged nerves, you might not feel pain, heat, or cold in your legs and feet. A sore or cut on your foot may get worse because you do not know it is there. This lack of feeling is caused by nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage can lead to a sore or an infection.


Poor blood flow. The second problem happens when not enough blood flows to your legs and feet. Poor blood flow makes it hard for a sore or infection to heal. This problem is called peripheral vascular disease, also called PVD. Smoking when you have diabetes makes blood flow problems much worse.


These two problems can work together to cause a foot problem.

For example, you get a blister from shoes that do not fit. You do not feel the pain from the blister because you have nerve damage in your foot. Next, the blister gets infected. If blood glucose is high, the extra glucose feeds the germs. Germs grow and the infection gets worse. Poor blood flow to your legs and feet can slow down healing. Once in a while a bad infection never heals. The infection might cause gangrene

How can diabetes hurt my feet?

What can I do to take care of my feet?